Sexually Transmitted Infections

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The sexual health assessment is a useful tool to assist you in determining how you can stay safe in your intimate relationships.  The questionnaire takes less than 3 minutes to complete, and provides you with a score that determines your risk of sexually transmitted infection (STIs). 

Participation in this survey is completely anonymous.

Use the Sexual Health Assessment Tool

 ASU Health Services provides STI testing to students. 

Sexually transmitted infections are infections that are passed from one partner to another during any form of sexual activity. Some infections have symptoms while others may not. If you are sexually active, it is recommended you get tested and know your status.

Testing can be scheduled with a provider to answer your questions and determine which tests best meet your needs or performed on a walk-in basis (without first meeting with a healthcare provider).

Walk-in testing is available at ASU Health Services locations for the following tests:

  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • HIV
  • Syphilis

For more information on STI causes, symptoms, and treatment options, please visit the patient portal or contact ASU Health Services provider at 480-965-3349.

HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. This virus so common that nearly all sexually active men and women will get it at some point in their lives. HPV is spread through sexual contact with someone who has the virus and can be contracted though vaginal, oral and anal sexual contact. Anyone who is sexually active can get HPV. In most cases, symptoms develop years after sexual contact with someone who is infected, making it hard to know when you first became infected. There are many different strains (types) of HPV. Some cause genital warts while others cause cancer of the cervix, vagina, penis or anus. Fortunately, some of the health effects caused by HPV can be prevented with vaccines. In other cases early detection is key to prevent further spread of the infection. Using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier methods with all sexual encounters, are some of the best ways to keep yourself safe.

For more information about HPV - please go to the CDC website:

HPV Fact Sheet: http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv.htm

HPV Fact Sheet for Men: http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv-and-men.htm

Testing and Treatment available at ASU Health Services

ASU Health Services encourages all males and females vaccinate against HPV. Vaccines are currently available at all health services locations for women and men up through age 26. Talk to an ASU Health Services provider about which form of the vaccine is best for you.

Women are screened for HPV during a PAP test beginning at age 21.

Routine screening is not currently recommended for men. A PAP test may be performed on men with increased risk for anal cancer including men with HIV or men who receive anal sex. If you are concerned about your risk for HPV, please make an appointment with an ASU Health Services provider to discuss.

GONORRHEA

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted infection that infects both men and women. It is an especially common infection in people ages 15 - 24. Gonorrhea is spread through vaginal, oral or anal sex. People exposed to gonorrhea can develop infection in the genitals, throat and/or the rectum. Common symptoms of gonorrhea may include: pain when urinating, anal itching, vaginal discharge, and vaginal bleeding between periods. Unfortunately, many people with gonorrhea do not have symptoms and may pass it onto a sexual partner without knowing it. Using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier methods with all sexual encounters, are some of the best ways to keep yourself safe. If gonorrhea is not treated it can cause serious and permanent health problems in men and women.

For more information about gonorrhea please go to the CDC website: http://www.cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/stdfact-gonorrhea.htm

Testing and Treatment available at ASU Health Services

ASU Health Services offers routine screening as well as testing for anyone with symptoms concerning for gonorrhea. In some cases, this can be done with a urine test or a swab can be used to collect a sample. We recommend routine screening yearly for people ages 18 - 24.

If you test positive, you will need to be treated with an antibiotic and inform your sexual partners so that they can be treated. You should not have sex for 7 days after you have finished treatment. You can still get infected again if you have unprotected sex with someone who has gonorrhea.

CHLAMYDIA

Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection that infects both men and women. It is spread through all forms of sexual contact including: vaginal, oral and anal contact. Common symptoms of chlamydia include discharge from the vagina or penis, burning when urinating, rectal pain, rectal discharge, and testicular swelling. Unfortunately, many people with chlamydia do not have symptoms and may pass it onto a sexual partner without knowing it. Using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier methods with all sexual encounters, are some of the best ways to keep yourself safe. If chlamydia is not treated it can cause serious and permanent health problems for men and women. Chlamydia can cause permanent damage to a woman’s reproductive system, making it difficult or impossible for her to get pregnant later in life.

For more information about gonorrhea please go to the CDC website: http://www.cdc.gov/std/Chlamydia/STDFact-Chlamydia.htm

Testing and Treatment available at ASU Health Services

ASU Health Services offers routine screening as well as testing for anyone with symptoms concerning for chlamydia. In some cases, this can be done with a urine test or a swab can be used to collect a sample. We recommend routine screening yearly for people ages 18 – 24.

If you test positive, you will need to be treated with an antibiotic and inform your sexual partners so that they can be treated. You should not have sex for 7 days after you have finished treatment. After you are treated, you can still get infected again if you have unprotected sex with someone who has chlamydia.

HIV/AIDS

HIV is a virus that spreads through body fluids and attacks the body’s immune system. One of the main ways HIV is transmitted is through sexual contact including: vaginal, anal and in some cases oral sex. HIV can lead to AIDS, which is an advanced stage of the illness with potentially life-threatening complications. Unlike many other sexually transmitted infections, there is no cure for HIV. This means that once you have HIV, you have it for life. Unfortunately, people with HIV don’t always have symptoms and may pass HIV onto their sexual partners without knowing it. Approximately 1 in 8 people who have HIV don’t know they have it. Using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier methods with all sexual encounters, are some of the best ways to keep yourself safe. In some cases medications can also be used as part of a prevention plan (see HIV PrEP Information following this section).

For more information about HIV/AIDS, please go to the CDC website: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/index.html

HIV PrEP Information

Depending on your circumstances, another possible option MAY be PrEP (Pre-exposure prophylaxis). PrEP is a prevention option for people who are at high risk of getting HIV. The CDC recommends that PrEP be considered for people who are HIV-negative and at substantial risk for HIV.

This would include anyone who:

  • Is in a relationship with an HIV-Positive partner
  • Is not in a mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who recently tested HIV-negative
  • Is a gay or bisexual male who has had anal sex without a condom or been diagnosed with an STI in the past 6 months
  • Is a heterosexual man or woman who does not regularly use condoms during sex with partners of unknown HIV status
  • Uses injectable drugs

 

The goal of PrEP is to prevent HIV infection from taking hold if you are exposed to the virus. This is done with a prescription pill that is taken daily. When taken every day, it can provide a high level of protection against HIV, and is even more effective when it is combined with condoms and other prevention tools.

ASU Health Services providers are available to determine if this is an appropriate option for you. Your provider will conduct a general physical exam and test you for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Your blood will also be tested to see if your kidneys and liver are working well. If these tests show that PrEP medicines are likely to be safe for you to take, your provider may give you a prescription.

For additional information go to: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html

Testing and Treatment available at ASU Health Services

ASU Health Services offers routine screening as well a testing for anyone with symptoms of HIV/AIDS. This can be done through a blood test or in some cases an oral swab.

The CDC recommends testing at least once between the age of 13 and 64. Some people should be tested more often than this including:

  • people with more than one sexual partner since their last HIV test
  • men who have sex with other men
  • people who have had sex with an HIV positive partner
  • people who use injection drugs and share needles
  • anyone who has been treated for another sexually transmitted infection
  • or people who have been sexually active with someone who have any of the risk factors above.

 

If you test positive for HIV you will be referred to a provider who specializes in HIV care.

SYPHILIS

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that causes long-term complications if not treated. The number of syphilis cases in the United States is on the rise. You can get syphilis through direct contact with a syphilis sore during a sexual encounter (vaginal, oral or anal). The main symptoms of syphilis is a painless sore on the penis, vagina, anus, in the rectum, on the lips, or in the mouth. However, this sore can look like many other conditions, or be in a place that is not easily visible. Many people with syphilis do not know they have it and can spread it to another person. Using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier methods with all sexual encounters, are some of the best ways to keep yourself safe.

For more information about syphilis please go to the CDC website: http://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/stdfact-syphilis.htm

Testing and Treatment available at ASU Health Services

ASU Health Services offers routine screening as well a testing for anyone with symptoms that are concerning for syphilis. Testing is done by drawing a blood sample. Syphilis is part of the general STI screening due to a higher than normal incidence of Syphilis in Maricopa County where ASU is located. Testing is recommended if you are pregnant, if you are a man who has sex with men, if you have an HIV infection, or if you have a partner who tests positive for syphilis.

If your test is positive you can be treated with an antibiotic. Once you are treated you can get syphilis again if you have sex with a person with syphilis.

HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS (HSV), TYPES 1 & 2

Herpes is a viral infection that affects both men and women. Approximately 1 in every 6 people ages 14 to 49 in the United States have genital herpes. You can get genital herpes by having, vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone else who has herpes, even if they do not have any visual sores. Herpes causes sores or blisters around the genital area, rectal area or the mouth. There is no cure for herpes, but there are medications that can prevent or shorten outbreaks. Using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier methods with all sexual encounters, are some of the best ways to keep yourself safe.

For more information about herpes, please go to the CDC Website: http://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/STDFact-herpes.htm

Testing and Treatment available at ASU Health Services

Testing for herpes is available if you have signs or symptoms of a possible infection, but is not generally recommended if you have no symptoms. Testing can be done with a swab of a suspicious finding. Blood testing may be an option in certain circumstances, but has limitations with interpretation, discuss with your medical provider to see if this is an appropriate test for you.

If you test positive for herpes then an antiviral medication can be used to treat and in some cases prevent an outbreak.