Sexual Violence

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Facts

  • 4.0% of ASU female students and 0.9% of ASU male students reported they experienced an attempted or completed sexual assault in the previous year. (unduplicated data)
  • 9.9% of ASU female students 3.5% ASU male students reported that they experienced sexual touching against their will in the previous year.
  • 2.6% of ASU female students and 1.3% of ASU male students reported they had been in a sexually abusive relationship in the previous year.

Sources:American College Health Association. American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment: Arizona State University Spring 2017. Baltimore: American College Health Association; Spring 2017 (n=2,096).

Basic Information

Basic Information

What is sexual assault?

  • Attempted or completed non-consensual sexual act
  • Touching
  • Anal, oral, or vaginal penetration
  • Threats of rape

Sexual Consent is clear, conscious, voluntary, mutual

  • Verbal agreement to engage in sexual activity; silence does not mean "yes"
  • Must be given by a sober, conscious individual
  • Must be given freely, with no emotional or physical force
  • Consent to one act of sex does not mean consent to all acts of sex

Acquaintance Rape VS. Stranger Rape

It might surprise you to know that about 9 out of 10 sexual assaults are committed by someone the victim knows, not a stranger.

Fisher, B.S., Cullen, F.T., and Turner, M.G., (2000). The Sexual Victimization of College Women (NCJRS Publication No. 182369). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, National Criminal Justice Reference Service.

Take Action to Stop Sexual Violence – we can all step up to challenge community norms and create change.

  • Raise awareness about sexual violence
  • Stop sexual violence in its tracks
  • Step Up and Do Something!
  • Challenge sexist norms when you see or hear them.
  • Prosecute perpetrators of sexual assault so they cannot easily repeat their crimes. The perpetrator is the only one who can truly prevent sexual assault

To Stop Sexual Violence in its Tracks

The perpetrator is the only one who can truly prevent sexual assault. However, the following actions can help to reduce the risk of victimization.

Recognize situations that may lead to sexual assault:

  • Using alcohol as a way to get sex.
  • Drugging someone’s drink(s).
  • Making someone feel uncomfortable with sexual advances.
  • Separating someone from their friends.
  • Pressure or threats to coerce another person into sexual acts.

Know or it’s “no.”

Silence does not equal a verbal "yes." Make sure that you have verbal consent before engaging in any sexual acts.

  • A person has the right to say no at any point during any sexual act, even if they have consented in the past.
  • If your partner says "no" or tells you to stop, stop immediately.
  • If your partner doesn’t say anything at all, ask, “Is this okay?” Make sure you know about consent.

Alcohol is the #1 date rape drug

  • Be aware of the risks associated with alcohol use.
  • More than half of completed sexual assaults among college women have been facilitated by alcohol use by the victim, in most cases on a voluntary basis.
  • In comparison, about 4% of completed sexual assaults among college women were drug-facilitated.
  • Remember—even if the victim has voluntarily consumed alcohol or other drugs, he or she is not responsible for their sexual assault. The perpetrator is to blame.

Krebs, C.K., Lindquist, C.H., Warner, T.D., Fisher, B.S., and Martin, S.L. (2009). College women’s experiences with physically forced, alcohol- or other drug-enabled, and drug-facilitated sexual assault before and since entering college. Journal of American College Health 57(6), 639-647.

Step Up! and Do something!

If you experience or observe a situation that could lead to non-consensual sex, do something! Take action to prevent a situation from escalating.

Protect Yourself

  • Talk to your friends about how you would want them to intervene if they notice you are uncomfortable or in a potentially dangerous situation.
  • Even someone you know and like can have different sexual intentions than you do. Express your intentions clearly.
  • Use your phone to stay in contact with friends through voice, text, Facebook, Twitter and photos.
  • Refuse to accept unwanted drinks or to drink alcohol in excess of your limits.
  • Call out inappropriate behavior: “Stop,” “I said NO,” “ Leave me alone,” and “Don’t touch me.”
  • If you feel uncomfortable with someone’s actions or advances, trust yourself. Leave the situation if you can. Find or call someone you know to help you stay safe.
  • Excuse yourself to go to the bathroom. Bring your phone and call a friend to help you leave the situation.
  • If you are concerned about your safety, call 911.

Protect Others

Talk to your friends about how they would want you to intervene if you noticed they were in an uncomfortable or potentially dangerous situation. You can:

  • Approach the potential victim and perpetrator.
  • Calmly say what you see (too much to drink, inappropriate behavior, concern for safety).
  • Be honest and direct.
  • Avoid using physical or verbal violence.
  • If you feel you cannot be direct you can:
    • Create a distraction to diffuse the situation.
    • Call or text the victim or perpetrator, if you know the number.
    • Recruit help from others if you need it.
    • If someone is in a dangerous situation, call 911.

Self-evaluation

Self-evaluation

If you or someone you know has experienced sexual violence:

What to do if you have experienced sexual violence

Among ASU students surveyed in 2013, 3.1% of female students and 0.7% of ASU male students experienced an attempted or completed sexual assault. Sexual assault can happen to anyone: any gender, any age, any socio-economic status, any profession, any ethnic or racial identity, any sexual orientation, any religious affiliation - anyone. You are not alone. Among ASU students surveyed, 3.3% of female students and 0.4% of ASU male students experienced an attempted or completed sexual assault in the previous year. In most cases, the victim and assailant know each other.

If you have experienced sexual assault you may feel angry, afraid, humiliated, confused, or numb. You may blame yourself, or make excuses for your assailant’s behavior. You may not know what to do or where to find support. The following information is a guide for you to help you find the information and support you may need for safety, medical, legal, counseling, and other considerations.

Find a Safe Place

  • If you feel you are in immediate danger, call 911.
  • In the immediate aftermath of sexual assault, the most important thing is your safety. Go to a safe place. Whether it is your residence, a friend’s place, or with a family member, your immediate safety is what matters most.
  • If you live on campus, contact your Community Assistant or Community Director for support.

Preserve Evidence of the Assault

  • Do not shower, bathe, douche, and/or brush your teeth or hair.
  • Save all the clothing you were wearing at the time you were assaulted in a paper bag.
  • Make every effort to save anything that might contain the assailant’s DNA. Do not clean up the crime scene or move anything the assailant may have touched.
  • Write down as much as you can remember about the circumstances of the assault, including a description of the assailant. If you have a picture of the assailant, prepare to give it to the police.

Filing a Police Report

  • Sexual assault is a serious crime. Even if you know your assailant, we encourage you to report the assault to the police.
    • To make a police report, call 911. The local police will send an officer to take your report. Make sure to say where the assault took place; on or off campus, and in which city.
    • If you were assaulted on campus, an ASU police officer will be sent to take your report.
    • Filing a police report does not obligate you to press charges. You may file a police report to document your experience without pressing charges.
  • Your report will be investigated if you choose to press charges. If there is sufficient evidence, the case will be submitted to the County Attorney’s office, where it will be determined if it can be successfully prosecuted.
    • Keep in mind that if the police determine that the suspect may pose a threat to the campus community, they will be obligated to disclose your case to other departments on campus, even if you prefer not to have your case investigated.

The Forensic Exam

  • A forensic exam can be performed up to 5 days following the assault. However, it is important to have a forensic exam as soon as possible for the best results.
    • Filing a Police Report for Sexual Assault
      For sexual assault, filing a police report does not obligate a survivor to press charges against an assailant. A forensic examination or rape kit can be performed up to 5 days following an assault. For more information please visit: https://rainn.org/get-information/legal-information/reporting-rape.
  • The forensic exam is available through several Family Advocacy Centers in the Phoenix area to collect and preserve evidence of the sexual assault. Forensic exams are performed by specially trained forensic nurses.
  • Even if you have not decided to report the crime, a forensic exam can be done to collect and keep the evidence safe. The evidence can be used at a later date if you decide to file a report. This type of exam is called a VAWA Sexual Assault Exam, and must be completed within 120 hours of the assault. If choosing this option, it is important for the victim to understand:
    • A delay in reporting to law enforcement may result in loss of other evidence which could negatively impact the case should the victim later decide to make a police report.
    • The exam is not done to test for sexually transmitted infections and/or pregnancy.
    • To schedule a VAWA Sexual Assault Exam, contact: Honor Health Forensic Nurse Examiners 480-312-6339
  • Family Advocacy Centers are designed to improve the reporting experience by locating many of the disciplines involved in the investigation and care of the victim in one building designed to support the investigation and care of the victim.
  • These centers can also link you to an advocate who is experienced in working with victims of sexual assault and will assist with discussing the assault with the forensic nurse, law enforcement, and/or counselors.
  • If you believe you were drugged, it is important to obtain a urine sample for a complete toxicology screen as soon as possible because some drugs can clear your system within a few hours. Blood may also be collected.

Medical Care

  • For your health and protection, it is important to be checked and treated for possible injuries, sexually transmitted infections. It is also important to be tested for pregnancy.
    • This can be done as a part of the forensic exam at a Family Advocacy Center, through ASU Health Services, through a private physician’s office or other medical facility.
    • Emergency contraception is available to prevent pregnancy. This is a prescription medication that can be taken up to 72 -120 hours after the assault, depending on the drug.
    • A follow-up medical exam should be completed in 4-6 weeks to test for HIV, sexually transmitted infections that have not been responsive to treatment. It is also important to be tested for pregnancy.

Counseling

  • Sexual assault is a traumatic experience. Talking to a counselor and/or people in your support system can be helpful if you are feeling upset or confused.
    • Counseling is offered through ASU Counseling Centers on each campus.
    • If you feel you need immediate assistance, Crisis Services are available through ASU Counseling Centers or call Empact's 24-hour ASU-dedicated crisis hotline at: 480-921-1006.

Student Affairs

  • Student Advocacy and Assistance provides referrals and contacts that can help you to address the academic and personal concerns that have resulted from your experience.Offices are located on each ASU Campus.
  • If the assailant is an ASU student, you can file a complaint with the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities This can be done with or without filing a police report. Your complaint will be investigated, and, if substantiated, result in disciplinary action for the assailant.

How to help a friend

How to help a friend

If someone you know has experienced sexual violence

Among ASU students surveyed, 3.1% of female students and 0.7% of ASU male students experienced an attempted or completed sexual assault in the previous year (2013). Sexual assault can happen to anyone: any gender, any age, any socio-economic status, any profession, any ethnic or racial identity, any sexual orientation, any religious affiliation, anyone. Among ASU students surveyed in spring 2011, 3.2% of female students and 0.6% of ASU male students experienced an attempted or completed sexual assault in the previous year. In most cases of sexual assault during college, the victim and assailant know each other.

Someone who has experienced sexual assault may feel angry, afraid, humiliated, confused, numb, feel at blame, or make excuses for the assailant’s behavior. She or he may not know what to do our where to find support. The following information is a guide for you to help someone who has experienced sexual assault find the information and support they need for safety, medical, legal, counseling and other considerations.

Safety

  • If the victim feels he or she is in immediate danger, call 911.
  • In the aftermath of sexual assault, the most important thing is safety. Help the victim identify a safe place and get there safely. Whether it is his/her residence, a friend’s place or with a family member, keeping the victim safe is what matters most.
  • If the victim lives on campus, contact a Community Assistant or Community Director for support.

Support the victim

  • Believe what is said.
  • Listen and comfort without taking control.
  • Say “this was not your fault.”
  • Foster a safe environment.
  • Encourage seeking medical attention.
  • Encourage counseling.

What to do

Review the information “What To Do If You’ve Experienced Sexual Violence” with the victim

This provides important information about:

  • Preserving evidence of the assault.
  • Filing a police report.
  • The forensic exam.
  • Medical care.
  • Counseling.
  • Filing a complaint against the assailant through the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities.
  • Getting help with academic and personal concerns through Student Advocacy and Assistance.

REPORT AN INCIDENT

REPORT AN INCIDENT

Sexual Violence Awareness and Response - Sun Devils take care of each other, our community and ourselves. ASU provides a variety of reporting optionsresources, and educational programsto prevent sexual misconduct.

ASSESSMENTS AND CLASSES

ASSESSMENTS AND CLASSES

Consent and Respect is an online education program designed to enhance awareness of sexual violence, intimate partner violence and stalking and their impact on college students, the importance of consent and respect in sexual situations, prevention and risk reduction strategies, as well as critical information on what to do if you or someone you know has any of these experiences.

resources

Programs and Activities

Programs and Activities